Is Stratford getting the vaccine?

Is+Stratford+getting+the+vaccine%3F

A year ago, many of us thought the world was ending.

Schools, stores and restaurants all closed because of COVID-19. We were instructed to stay at home and “shelter in place.”

Now that a year has passed, vaccines have finally been developed,  allowing some of the health guidelines to be lightened or even lifted. 

A common question that has recently been asked at Stratford Academy has been “are you going to get the vaccine?” Many students and teachers already have had both doses, while others are hesitant and are willing to wait.

“We’re really trying to aim for herd immunity. With our healthy community, the vaccine is supposed to help us not spread it as easily to others, so if we vaccinate ourselves we reduce the risk of taking the virus home and spreading it.”

— Stratford school nurse Victoria Lee

 

School nurse Mrs. Victoria Lee (Gazebo Photo by AJ Stevenson)

Lorna Bohnenstiehl, a sophomore, received her first shot in late March. She said her experience was “super easy and only took 15 minutes.” Since she is 16, she received the Pfizer shot. Although she experienced slight joint pain after her first dose, Lorna is looking forward to getting her second dose and says the workers were “very nice and friendly.”

Unlike Lorna, sophomore Maddie Dummit has opted not to receive the vaccine. 

“No. 1, I’m terrified of shots. No. 2, the estimated herd immunity for COVID is 60-70 percent, so once 60-70 percent of the population gets it, there is no need for me to.,” Maddie said.

Some people like Madison James are willing to get the vaccine, but have to wait due to past COVID antibodies. Although she is not planning on getting it yet, the waiting period for people who encountered COVID and still have past antibodies is 90 days. Madison tested positive for COVID in February and had to quarantine for almost two weeks. She still has antibodies, so she is not eligible to receive it.  

It’s been a long trip for the vaccine. Many trials have been run to ensure that everyone can safely obtain the vaccine with limited side effects. The first time it was given to someone in the United States outside of a trial run was in December 2020. Sandra Lindsey, a New York ICU nurse, received the Pfizer vaccine after stating that she “has no fear” and “trusts the science.” 

Since then, the vaccine has been distributed to millions of Americans. At first, the CDC prioritized adults at the age of 65 and over. Recently, the availability was extended to people who work in medical and educational professions and children 16 and over have been cleared to receive the vaccine.

Now that people have the opportunity to become immunized from COVID, Stratford is encouraging everyone to get the vaccine. 

“We’re really trying to aim for herd immunity.’’ Stratford school nurse Mrs. Victoria Lee said. “With our healthy community, the vaccine is supposed to help us not spread it as easily to others, so if we vaccinate ourselves we reduce the risk of taking the virus home and spreading it.” 

Mrs. Lee does not believe the vaccine should be a requirement for everyone to come to school.

“It is not a good idea because of all of the unknowns, but some places may begin to make it a requirement,’’ she said.

So far, 91 out of 138 faculty members have received the vaccine. 

“Everyone has been very eager and willing to receive the vaccine,” Mrs. Lee said. “I believe this will help us achieve that herd immunity that we’re trying to accomplish.”